Traditional Keys

Not all traditional keys are the same. You might have observed that in your key rings, there are various types of them. Locksmith Newcastle provides any key-related services.

Double/Four-Sided Key

The two-sided and four-sided keys commonly used on home locks differ from standard keys in that have two or four sets of teeth. A collection of four teeth is the result of a more durable key. An extra set of teeth also makes it harder to pick locks in your home using increased security and an easy way to prevent thieves.

 Transponder Key

The transponder is an electronic key used in modern cars. Basically, inside the transponder keys is a chip that is connected to the car’s ignition. In some cases where the wrong key is used, some car models will turn off completely.

 Skeleton Key

A skeleton key with a cylindrical shaft and a single toothed end is used to open ward locks. A skeleton key has been caught to some extent to catch any key that can open any particular kind of lock.

Abloy Key

Abloy key is used on disk tumbler locks. Abloy Key is a unique key that rotates the disk-like a tumbler and arranges it in place to unlock it. It’s springless, and it’s known for being impossible to pick.

Dimple Key

A simple key is a key that uses cone-shaped dimples on the key to match two sets of pins in a lock. Dimples are attached in the same way on all sides, which means that there is no need to be based on a particular key direction to work correctly.

Tubular Key

A tubular key also called a barrel key, is a small key with a cylindrical shaft used to open a tubular pin tumbler lock. These keys are often found in items such as vending machines and motorcycle locks. In general, these keys are more difficult to replicate than standard Tumbler keys.

Keycard

Keycards are used in most hotels these days. The cards are small and flat and are inserted into a door mechanism to unlock them. The tool reads the signature, usually found on the card’s magnetic stripe, to open the door.

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